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Discovering Brusa

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A Historic Ottoman Capital

A visit to Brusa, the once vibrant capital of the Ottoman Empire, requires a minimum of three days, including a full day to explore the city. Travelers need a Teskereh (refer to p. 32). The steamers connecting Constantinople and Mudania, Brusa’s port, vary in comfort, with some like the Bengazi and Adranit providing a better experience on Sundays, Tuesdays, and Fridays (returning on Sundays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays). However, passengers should bring their own provisions for the journey.

The departure time of the steamers is not fixed but usually falls between 8:30 AM and 10:30 PM. Through return tickets to Brusa are available through Messrs. Thos. Cook and Sons, 12 Bue Kabristan, Pera Treasures of Brusa.

The journey from Constantinople to Mudania takes approximately 4.5 to 5 hours on the screw steamers. From Mudania, a 1.75-hour train ride connects travelers to Brusa. Trains align with steamer

A Glimpse into Ottoman History

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Towards the end of the eleventh century, Brusa came under the control of the Seljuk Turks. However, they abandoned the city following the Crusaders’ capture of Nicsea in 1097 A.D. During Theodore Lascaris’s retreat to Brusa after the Latin capture of Constantinople, the town faced an unsuccessful siege in 1204 A.D. by around 100 French forces led by Pierre de Bracheux and Payen d’Orleans. In 1326, the Turks, under Orkhan I., successfully took Brusa after a ten-year siege, establishing it as the capital of their Empire. Brusa thrived under Turkish rule, attracting poets, tile-makers, and dervishes from various parts of Asia. Many churches and monasteries were transformed into mosques and mausoleums, while new charitable institutions, public buildings, and mosques were constructed. Notably, Brusa was where the formidable Janissaries were first organized during Osman’s reign.

Modern Brusa is the principal town in the Hudavendighiar province, governed by a Yal

Treasures of Brusa

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Mosques, Tombs, and Citadel

Ulu Jami (The Big Mosque)

Ulu Jami, also known as The Big Mosque, stands as a testament to the contributions of three successive sultans—Murad I, Bayazid I, and Muhammad I. The pulpit, crafted by an Egyptian sculptor, rivals that of the Sinope mosque. Although the mosque’s current appearance is modern, its historical significance is undeniable. Admission for a party of up to three people costs 5 piastres (10d.).

Teshil Jami (The Green Mosque)

Built in 1418 by Muhammad I A Glimpse into Ottoman History, The Green Mosque is a prominent ornament in Brusa. Notable for its meticulous design, elegant structure, and exquisite marble-work, the mosque’s gate is a striking feature, adorned with the first chapter of the Koran and intricate floral designs. The elaborate inscription took three years to complete, costing Muhammad I 4000 ducats. The mosque derives its name from

KARS

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Istanbul Custom Tours

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Discovering Brusa

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